Harmony Import & Export

CARE INSTRUCTION

  • A mango is ripe and ready to be eaten when
    1. The colour turns from green to light yellow to orangish depending upon the variety.

    2. The skin gives a little when pressed softly. If it is too mushy, the mango is over-ripe.

    3. The mango gives off a delicious sweet fragrance.

    4. When selecting a mango, please note that mangoes don’t necessarily have to be evenly coloured all over. Some mangoes have a greater degree of ‘blush’ than others, and different varieties naturally develop different skin tones. Some mangoes may have small marks or skin blemishes. This is normal and is caused by the fruit rubbing against a branch or another piece of fruit on the tree. Small skin marks will not affect the internal quality of the flesh – they will still taste delicious! If you want your mango to last a few days at home before eating, select a slightly firmer mango with tight skin.


  • How to store mango ?

      1. If you find your mangoes are not quite ripe enough, store them at room temperature between 18 -22°C and out of the sun for a few days until the fruit ripens.

      2. Storing them in a paper bag, newspaper above and below a single layer of fruit place side by side or wrapped in a blanket (this will increase the ripening faster and has to be monitored regularly)for a few days will also help them along. When stored properly a mango should have a shelf life of about a week and while the mango will not ripen in the refrigerator, it can be kept chilled there once ripe, or it can be frozen, dried, cooked in syrup or puréed.

  • To get the best taste out of your mangoes, follow these simple storage tips:

    1. Mangoes should not be refrigerated until they are ripe.

    2. Fully ripe mangoes can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days.

    3. Never store mangoes in plastic bags – mangoes need air!

  • Slice & Scoop" Mango Cutting Method

  • Stand the mango on your cutting board stem end down and hold. Place your knife about 1/4" from the widest center line and cut down through the mango. Flip the mango around and repeat this cut on the other side. The resulting ovals of mango flesh are known as the "cheeks". What's left in the middle is mostly the mango seed.

  • Cut parallel slices into the mango flesh, being careful not to cut through the skin.

  • Scoop the mango slices out of the mango skin using a large spoon.

  • "Inside Out" Mango Cutting Method

  • Stand the mango on your cutting board stem end down and hold. Place your knife about 1/4" from the widest center line and cut down through the mango. Flip the mango around and repeat this cut on the other side. The resulting ovals of mango flesh are known as the "cheeks". What's left in the middle is mostly the mango seed.

  • Turn the scored mango cheek inside out by pushing the skin up from underneath.

  • Scrape the mango chunks off of the skin, using a knife or a spoon.

  • Scrape the mango chunks off of the skin, using a knife or a spoon.

  • Using a Mango Splitter

  • Stand the mango on your cutting board stem end down and hold. Center the Mango Splitter above the mango, with the opening in the splitter aligned with the widest part of the mango.

  • Firmly push down to separate the mango flesh from the seed.

  • Use the "Slice and Scoop" or the "Inside Out" methods shown above to separate the mango flesh from the skin in cubes, dices or slices.